Friday, January 16, 2009

Mainstream Conspiraloons #626 - Napoleon Solo

The Man from L.O.O.N.C.L.E.




Good, I always liked his TV show. And if the Way of the Conspiraloon is good enough for the last surviving member of the Magnificent Seven it's good enough for me

A quick reminder of why shooting RFK, unlike Obama, in the face would have been an excellent idea as far as some people were concerned...


"Too much and for too long, we seemed to have surrendered personal excellence and community values in the mere accumulation of material things. Our Gross National Product, now, is over $800 billion dollars a year, but that Gross National Product - if we judge the United States of America by that - that Gross National Product counts air pollution and cigarette advertising, and ambulances to clear our highways of carnage. It counts special locks for our doors and the jails for the people who break them. It counts the destruction of the redwood and the loss of our natural wonder in chaotic sprawl. It counts napalm and counts nuclear warheads and armored cars for the police to fight the riots in our cities...

Yet the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages, the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials. It measures neither our wit nor our courage, neither our wisdom nor our learning, neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country, it measures everything in short, except that which makes life worthwhile."

Robert F. Kennedy
University of Kansas
March 18, 1968


June 6th 1968

.

53 comments:

Anonymous said...

I believe Ernest Borgnine is adamant that Lyndon B Johnson had Kennedy killed too.

Stef said...

that's news to me

and fantastic news at that

Stef said...

I'm a big Ice Station Zebra fan and, imho, Borgnine's submarine-based Russian accent remained unsurpassed in its quality and authenticity until Sean Connery's turn in Hunt for the Red October

paul said...

And he doesn't have much truck with monkey business:

Actor Ernest Borgnine has been nominated for a Golden Globe in the made for
TV best actor category. Borgnine, along with pal Tony Curtis, led the
Motion Picture Academy's infamous attack on the Gay cowboy movie,
BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN in 2006. Borgnine made disparaging comments on the
critically acclaimed film, saying it defamed the late legendary cowboy
icon John Wayne. He also refused even to see BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN, he told
Entertainment Weekly magazine.

Such orchestrated attacks, said BBM's producer James Schamus, were
pivotal in its losing the Best Picture Oscar that year. Borgnine
is nominated for a cable TV movie called A GRANDPA FOR CHRISTMAS.
BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN received four Golden Globe awards, including
Best Dramatic film. Borgnine will be 91 next month

lwtc247 said...

Come on Stef. You don't seriously believe RFK's actually meant anything by that do you?

Stef said...

Well, he did pass the 'Bullet in the Face' challenge

Stef said...

The Bullet in the Face Challenge is a bit like the old test for witches

If she drowns she's not a witch

lwtc247 said...

It seems to me there's something psychological in the fallen hero that was to.

You see it with Bobby's brother too. The fact that Kennedy is the one that spring-loaded the onset of the Vietnam war, and all the other mass murdering crap fades from peoples minds somehow. As does the Bay of Pigs. And JFK made that weird speech about hidden powerful elements in the US administration along with signing that interesting bill about money.

Lets not forget that it was tricky slippy dicky who because of the Vietnam war scrapped any tie of the dollar to gold.

I know the regs here are dispassionate about gold, but it seems to me JFK would have tripped that Vietnam spring and would have done just the same thing as Nixon.

Lets also not forget JFK let McNamara apply his stupid Game theory upon the USans and many other places around the world too.

It seems possible to ne that JFK was setting up a straw man to use as an excuse to bring about a more totalitarian state. We've often seen Newspeak leaders espouse seemingly lovely words and then do almost the complete opposite.

Yours in hardcore loonery...
lw

Anonymous said...

Nixon Speech Announcing First Watergate Resignations (part 1 of 3)

Stef said...

@lwtc247

Executive Order 11110

Stef said...

/ harder core

Antipholus Papps said...

But now I just want to see Ernest Borgnine star in Escape from Brokeback Mountain!

lwtc247 said...

Stef.

Is there no end to your research/information uncovering talents?

Stef said...

yes, and it's not far off now hopefully

Stef said...

and if we're posting links to Nixon speeches Checkers definitely requires a mention

Stef said...

the fact that Ernest turns out to be a deranged old homophobe only adds to his quirky, individualistic appeal imho

Stef said...

@lwtc247

on the subject of my anitpathy towards fixating on gold as a potential solution to the money fraud at the heart of the world's ills

whilst I do understand and sympathise with the principle of linking money with something of tangible worth I have a problem with gold for several reasons

1. It's just metal, with some limited industrial applications but out of all proportion to the worth that gold bugs would attach to it. In that respect, its value would be potentially overstated almost as badly as fiat cash. There isn't much of the stuff about and global economic activity has got pretty large

2. Countries/ regions which have little in the way of indigenous supply of precious metals would have to ship them in, to the advantage of countries and reasons which have a surplus

3. The people who currently control the fiat cash also control the gold price and supply

I've spoken with a few well-read Muslims about what I perceived to be an Islamic obsession with gold as some kind of panacea. As far as they were concerned, a workable currency wouldn't have to be fixed to gold - it could be fixed to any commodity or resource which fairly reflected the real wealth and wealth generating capacity of whichever state or organisation was issuing it

lwtc247 said...

Then it seems to me that those Muslims are deviating from Islam. Which I guess, is their choice.

I recommend you and they read this short book. It will help explain things.

http://www.imranhosein.org/
---media/books/dinarbook.pdf

(remove hyphens and line break)

Stef said...

You might want to have a word with the people who established the Islamic Party of Britain who seem to made no reference whatsoever to a gold-fixed currency in their statement of economic policies and simply called for the abolition of usury and the end of private control of the money supply

Stef said...

In fairness, of the limited selection of practicing Muslims I've talked with about gold, most are total gold bugs but I have met a couple who ain't - and in all other respects they come across as pretty orthodox

Stef said...

NB At current prices the total value of above ground gold in the world is something like US$3.5 trillion dollars, silver about US$15 billion

the relatively small size of the silver market is counter intuitive and the reason why the occasional non Rothschild-funded berk gets ideas above his station and tries to corner the market every now and again

US$15bn - that's like just 20% of what was spunked just on Northern Rock

lwtc247 said...

would love a word but I know it would be pointless.

My life’s experience tells me that ALL Muslim groups have their deviations and corruptions.

And of course, i have no hesitation whatsoever in saying they would look at me and say the same thing.

Most groups in the UK are a joke really - especially MCB - headed by a man who pledged himself to be "Abdul Elizardbeth Regina" and not "Abdul Lah"

These groups are that wish-washy secularists (an act of "Shirk") putting their reformulations ahead of what has already be prescribed.

Shirk is the gravest of sins.

Even MPAC and Hizb'ut Tahrir who, respectively write many superb articles and know Islamic philosophy extremely well advocate things I believe are questionable at best, sinful at worst and as for HT I keep them at arms length, able to grab them when necessary.

Many Ulama's are ignorant of what usury is. They think it's just Interest. Ho ho! - how utterly wrong they are (as the booklet will hopefully show - I read it when it was [just about] first published)

"Gold is just a metal" - Not so - its desire for jewellery is what gives gold its intrinsic wealth. Gold is the most desired of decorations and colours.

Cheers btw for the GKaufmann link.

Stef said...

I will read that book

lwtc247 said...

Generally Muslims misunderstand economics, not that most try and study it mind you!

In exactly the same way most non-Muslims are ignorant to what financial wheeler-dealer things are going on in their name, so are most Muslims.

Ignorance and stupidity transcend all sapien divisions.

Even "Knowledgeable Muslims" have neglcted their study of Ismaic codes and practice of economics.

Their subconscious believes the fiat system offers them greater potential to become rich. That old devil called money!

lwtc247 said...

'I will read that book' - Good man.

It's deliberately brief to encourage neglectful Muslims to get off their arse and wake them the hell up! Not so sure that's possible tho.

Anonymous said...

From what I have observed, Islamic communities have allowed themselves to be misled by culture and clerics among other things. Not that I am any expert on the subject, after all I'm "Kafir".

Parabellum said...

The UoK RFK speech:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLw-WLlM9aw
(Couldn't find a version without stupid docu stock music)

Stef said...

without Italian subtitles or, um, inspirational backing track

Anonymous said...

so i'm supposed to believe it wasn't an intelligence service? somehow i'm not convinced.

Stef said...

No, nor am I

It's one thing to arrange to have someone shot

An altogether different barrel of biscuits making sure that the crime isn't properly investigated afterwards

lwtc247 said...

@ Anonymous 16 January 2009 20:36

You might appreciate, these days more than others, Muslims are weary of outsiders like Bush and Bliar telling then what Islam is and what Islam isn't, inc. things like Qadiani's and Ed Hussain's 'the Quilliam foundation' - Eeew, my skin is crawling. I think the claim by that religious group in the States that they had cloned a human are true after all. Look at Pics of Ed Hussain and then look at a pic of one T. Bliar.

You'll surely agree that the number of non-Muslims that understand what it means to Muslim, hence and the corresponding worldly perceptions resulting from that, is very small indeed.

Distasteful when whites tell jokes about blacks, but seemingly alright when blacks do it.

From my experience it's very common that most proposals (political/economic or otherwise) by a non-Muslim to a Muslim usually involve the Muslim having to compromise on his principles.

However, I agree with you observation that there certainly does appear to be some 'misdirection' by clerics in more ways that one.


P.S. I just googled "Quilliam foundation" This is what I got...
Quilliam Foundation
Reviving Western Islam & Uniting Against Extremism.
www.quilliamfoundation.org/

Western Islam?? *cough* *splutter*

lwtc247 said...

just as puzzling is the REVING western Islam. As if it had withered. When and Who oversaw that episode. What was its purpose? What version of Islam replaced the initial western Islam.

It's great the way knowledge from the subconscious pops out like that.

Anonymous said...

Ah, but lwtc247, I was raised as one and read the Quran so I would consider myself to have reasonable knowledge. Of course, that is assuming you can take the holy books at face value.

Anyway, these were hardly intricate things I was referring to. Really simple stuff like the way you treat your children or spouse for example.

lwtc247 said...

@ At Anonymous 17 January 2009 17:20

In that case, (which was previously unknown) naturally your opinion carries has greater weight, but if it laid bare for you to choose to accept it or not and you decided against it, as I would say is your God given right, but you would not perhaps, appreciate the progressive conclusions and path that acceptance and belief takes one, and therefore still have some pieces of the jigsaw puzzle. If I may employ a crap analogy, the choice to accept Islam is so significant its if you accept it you board the plane at terminal 1, if you reject it - terminal 2. You start off in the same place airport, but pretty soon after take off, your many many miles apart.

And really, it’s not rational to expect a believer to objectively listen to someone who says things that would shatter the entire foundation of how he decided to structure his life. For a human to make such a step, empirically speaking, is highly unlikely. After all, presumably the believer has thought at great length about his decision to accept faith in God and the practice of worship into his life. Even people ‘born into religion’ I am sure have thought about it and weighted it up.

I believe there is a certain face value aspect to the Holy books. The religion claims to be applicable to all people (those who accept the fundamental principle: Is there a God), for all times. From the village simpleton (face value) to the most dedicated scholar (deep allegorical, metaphorical numerological analysis etc.). But it’s difficult for me to accept that should a difference between the simpleton and the scholar break out that the simpleton is wrong. Interpretation is subject to error, less so for literal understanding.

But I do agree with you, Islam (and other religions) appear at times, manipulated by leaders. Yet leadership is a strong aspect of monotheistic culture. The problem I think is that it's the leaders who are bad because they are ignorant of it (or they are simply frauds) and yield to its abuse (consciously or subconsciously) for their own purposes. I would say however that usually this isn’t an issue among the people, but for the small people jostling for power, or yes; the misguided, nay blasphemous thought that bad things can be done in the name of God.

Anonymous said...

@ lwtc47, I'm agnostic if it makes any odds.

So anyway, are you implying my opinion on this isn't worth listening to because I'm biased? Don't get me wrong, there are tenets of (religious beliefs in general) that I agree with.

Examples being:

-No alcohol (It never appealed to me)
-The emphasis on family and stable relationships
-Not treating life as a big joke all the time
-The usual "good qualities of a person" like honesty and helping others
-I also hate materialism


I could go on, but do you understand where I'm coming from?

Anonymous said...

*continues from above*

Both myself and my girlfriend that there is something beyond the physical world that we see, the difference being that we don't claim to know it all.

Stef said...

I think there might be a "believe" or a "think" missing from that last sentence

and I'm kind of hoping that if there is a Creator that it doesn't begrudge me the occasional small glass of Drambuie on a cold winter's evening...

Stef said...

lager drinkers, on the other hand, deserve everything that's coming to them

Anonymous said...

@Stef - Yes, it would help if there was an edit button, excuse that grammatical error on my part. I did mean to say "think" in that sentence.

Anyway, don't worry about the odd alcoholic drink, its not like I stop the other half from having a glass of vodka or wine if she feels like it.

A lot of people don't know when to stop though...

Stef said...

or even want to

Anonymous said...

Useful distraction for those in charge though - thats how it started, to distract us from poor working conditions in the Victorian era. Hence "drowning your sorrows".

Stef said...

I think we can go back a bit further than that

Anonymous said...

Ok, so around the same time as industrialisation then :p I was referring more to the whole "drinking culture" thing but you got me with the trump card there.

Stef said...

lol

that wasn't my intention, I know where you were coming from

Anonymous said...

Well, as one of those made recently unemployed it looks like I'll be on the dole queue a while. 1 interview out of 100 job applications...

Stef said...

:(

Anonymous said...

I'm located in London which doesn't help. You know all too well the effects of immigration and government policy over the last decade.

In fact, thanks to Thatcher in particular its dead easy to fire someone in the first few months (even in the first year) because they have limited legal rights.

lwtc247 said...

In my spare time, I have been known not to write gibberish. My method of composition really sucks!

Perhaps I just part of the phantasmic force recently appearing on this blog, being an illusory monkey furiously banging away on an equal illusory keyboard.

I do apologise. Time to tighten the belt methinks.

lwtc247 said...

I could go on, but do you understand where I'm coming from?

Indeed I do.

Stef said...

In fact, thanks to Thatcher in particular its dead easy to fire someone in the first few months (even in the first year) because they have limited legal rights.

It's worth remembering, of course, that the current government has had 11 years to put things straight. It certainly managed to find enough parliamentary time to spunk away on lots of other nonsense

Anonymous said...

Yes they have. Apparently fox hunting is more important.

Stef said...

^spooky mind-reading powers^

Anonymous said...

LOL, is that what you were about to say? Great minds think alike eh..