Saturday, January 03, 2009

The Banking System explained...




Children's entertainment sure has changed a lot in forty years




.

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

You'll find the wikipedia article doesn't entirely support the link you made, Stef. But of course we know wikipedia has a lot of the same problems as mainstream media...

Merkin said...

Beat me to it, Stef!

Gandy?! said...

Here's some pictures of the ruined Bank of England, by Mr. Joseph Gandy.

http://traumwerk.stanford.edu:3455/71/45

Stef said...

You'll find the wikipedia article doesn't entirely support the link you made, Stef. But of course we know wikipedia has a lot of the same problems as mainstream media...

Yes, yes it does - and it's getting noticeably worse

Stef said...

In my search for other examples of subversive children's entertainment, I've just returned from a vain quest to find a clip of that scene where the proletarian mice in Bagpuss go on strike and stage a secondary secondary picket in Trumpton

No joy unfortunately. So their charming, ever so slightly Wickermanesque, theme song will have to do

AngryMob said...

A NATIONALLY televised meeting between Iceland's prime minister and other political leaders was forced off the air last night by angry protesters.

For more than two decades, the leaders of Iceland's political parties have met every New Year's Eve over champagne and spiced herring to talk on Iceland's Channel 2 television about the year ahead.

But this year's programme with the prime minister, Geir Haarde, was cut short after 45 minutes when a torch-wielding crowd stormed Reykjavik's Hotel Borg in an attempt to get to the studio.

Protesters inside and outside the hotel clashed with police, who fired pepper spray to disperse the 500-strong crowd that threw water balloons and tossed firecrackers.

Outside the hotel, a policeman hit on the head with a brick had to be admitted to hospital. Three protesters were arrested.

Stef said...

by the standards of the normally super laid back Icelanders that qualifies as civil war

I wonder how we will behave when our turn comes

ziz said...

I have long since lost the ability to cope with the reality and real politik of the insane, lying bankers .. never mind discovering hidden agendas in harmless fun.

I see Mr Darling is about to ladle out more funds into the black hole in the fond belief that the arseholes who created it are somehow going to put it back together again.

Stupidity said Einstein, is doing the same thing over and over again and enjoying the lively expectation that next time there will be a different result.

With the state of the world and the currency as it is, I am tempted to withdraw the remaining cash available from the moneylenders , stock up on the finest Armagnac and some lively young ladies.

Hoping against hope, that even though experience, and 9 years on the waggon, suggests I will wake with a sore head and even sorer dick .. but with the hope that it won't.

Won't solve the financial crisis but it might attack the mid life one.

ziz said...

2nd thoughts.

I could spend those post coital moments explaining fractional reserve banking to my lissome and exhausted young friends , larded with examples from velocity of the money supply and how the creation of wealth is not equivalent to GDP (even when unadjusted this month from last months declared figure).

Or would they go for Wizard of Oz on a DVD ?

Hard choices. Tough decisions ... as Gordon might say.

gyg3s said...

"I wonder how we will behave when our turn comes"

It may be getting very close if this post from hatfield Girl is on the nose.

"In their craving for liquidity it is the payments system that finds itself in the front line. Any entity facing a credit shortage delays payments. In Russia in the early 1990s payment arrears - of government wages and pensions, of government purchases that caused suppliers in turn to fail to pay their own wages and suppliers, reached forty percent of industrial output. Barter was rampant. Companies in England, in domestic and in foreign trade can engage in barter too. Quite possibly they are.

We, householders, cannot engage in barter with suppliers of gas, electricity, communication services, water; with local authorities, tax collectors, health suppliers, etc. Banks can delay payments with impunity, including wage and pension payments. For the denied potential consumer, though, there are penalties from fines, to withdrawal of service, to loss of reputation, to imprisonment.

Of all the failures of bank activities, it is the failure of a completely reliable payments system that will cause gross, immediate, disruption of every aspect of life in a country. We have never experienced what happened in Russia in the early 1990s. Last week a lot of pay rolls were not met due to a 'technical glitch'. ...
"

ziz said...

Hmmmmm. Maybe this little slippery minx to whom I have been trying to explain "quantitative easing" has taken on board what the young (?) lady from Hatfield is saying about payment systems.

She won't take a cheque.

Anonymous said...

Not really childrens entertainment, but this clip of Steptoe and son has some great conspiraloonery

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=_10zHLZzbwM

From about 2m25s in...

We don't get anything like this on today's comedy shows do we?

Stef said...

An outstanding find, thank you

The BBC really has changed a lot since then hasn't it

Antipholus Papps said...

subversive children's entertainment

I've always thought that Mr Benn was covertly pushing LSD consumption (especially with the flashbacks as he walked back down Festive Road - where everything reminded him of his adventure). And Magic Roundabout was entirely about dope and speed (Dougal and the Blue Cat).

I also think that Mary Poppins is personally responsible for the entire 1960s counter-culture revolution. A spoonful of sugar indeed!

The banking scam is clarified quite well in It's A Wonderful Life too.

Stef said...

a cubeful of sugar shurely?