Saturday, October 13, 2007

Search for a Star

I'm unashamed about my interest in elitist symbolism hidden in plain view amongst us. I'll also be one of the first to admit that it's often virtually impossible to definitively prove that possible examples of elitist symbolism are deliberate and not just coincidental

though I do have some personal favourites, such as the pentagram-obsessed Washington street plan and some examples nearer to home in London, which I think are pretty hard to deny...

The umpteenth appearance of the Buckingham Pyramid in this blog...


The dollar bill is another example of a design so clearly laden with the symbolism associated with certain fruity little clubs that mainstream sources usually choose to ignore the issue altogether rather than pretend that the symbolism is not there




In comparison, British money has offered much less in the way of easy symbolic pickings which can be identified and decoded by the profane

but the times may be a-changing

A couple of days ago someone suggested that a few minutes spent looking closely at the new £20 note would cheer me up to no end...




£20 notes are a rare event in my back pocket but the other 1/2 happened to have one and, yes, I was entertained, even though she remembered to ask for it back after I'd finished with it...



I won't spoil the fun by drawing any lines, and it's much easier to see in the flesh on an actual note, but the Bank of England appears to have a provocative little something sticking out of its roof. Two things actually

Here's a clue to one of those things taken from the back of the dollar bill


Methinks someone might just be taking the piss...

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edit: OK, three things if you count the sideways Star Fleet logo


but who's to say the Rothschilds don't control that too

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edit2: and whilst on the subject of fruity little elitist clubs and their symbolism, today is, of course, the 700th anniversary of the dissolution of the Knights Templar (or were they? mwuhaahaha!!). No doubt the modern day fruity little clubs which claim to trace their lineage back to this group of weirdo warrior bankers will be celebrating the anniversary, as well as the recent announcement by the Vatican that the the Templars probably weren't quite as naughty as they were made out to be at the time...




There again, maybe not

.

21 comments:

Tony said...

Common Purpose logo? I think you are starting to condition me...

Anonymous said...

Just read a post over at rig.int ...

re the second clip.

There is a picture by Dali: I think it's called the lace maker (maybe not?). Not one of his melting clocks but a painting of an old woman making some lace. She is in the centre of the picture and all lines are drawn to her; not only to her but to her hands; not only to her hands but to the needle in one of her hands. Except, if you look closely ... there isn't a needle.

(I'm sure it's by Dahli but I can't remember the name of the painting - if anyone knows its name I'd be interested).

Stef said...

@tony

well spotted...

http://tinyurl.com/yuzfop

Stef said...

and whilst we're posting links to videos

Common Purpose - the (totally non creepy) movie...

www.911archive.info/flash/commonpurpose.html

Anonymous said...

Some BoE trivia:
The Bank of England was founded by a b Scotsman William Paterson, in 1694 & a picture of Adam Smith, another Scotsman, dons the back of the new Bank of England £20 note.

Stef said...

Scotland is, of course, legendary for being a Fruity Little Club Free zone

Stef said...

a picture of Adam Smith, another Scotsman, dons the back of the new Bank of England £20 note.

hmhmm, invisible hands

mark my words, the new £20 note is set to become a Conspiraloon™ classic

Shutter said...

Has anyone considered the dimensions of the new £20 note ?

Stef said...

not that I'm aware of

according to the BoE the new note is the same as the old and measures 149mm x 80mm (approximately) which yields a ratio of 1.8625 (approximately)

Admittedly I don't 'do' numerology but that's not ringing any bells with me

paul said...

1.8625
5 X 8 = 40
(40-6)+1 =35
35/2 =17.5
which resolves to 18 as the nearest whole number
3 6's give you 18

666 !!!

Fucking obvious, really

Stef said...

...and that is why I don't 'do' numerology

methinks Carol Vordeman would be absolutely ace at this sort of thing, maybe in the context of some kind of ConspiraCountdown TV special

Shutter said...

You are however using the old Norman French Methodology (which, without wishing to teach a new dog old tricks went out with Nostradamus - for a more accurate result ....

149-80 = 69

Delicacy forbids explanation how the new see through register interlaces the Scottish forerunner of the dismal science frae the lang toon and her Gracious majesty exhibit the necessary interlacing patterns.

NB : This only works in metric.

Stef said...

/ slaps forehead

Stef said...

/ doesn't get invited to the sort of parties where people have graduated beyond Norman French

Stef said...

/ still doing things Greek style

paul said...

I thought of the metric one as well, but feared it would sully this blog to refer to such elite perversions

Stef said...

I didn't

and why would reference to the astrological symbol for Cancer sully this blog?

or am I missing out on something

Shutter said...

Apologies, but having laundered a crisp £5 at 20-1 on the final handicap at York today on the suitably named HO Ho Ho which led the field and romped in a close second ... the proceeds have been placed upon les bleu in a contest which commences in a minute...

Am feeling a little light headed.

Bon soir !

paul said...

I think you'll have a happier life if you remain blissfully ignorant of these practices

Stef said...

There is a picture by Dali: I think it's called the lace maker (maybe not?)

I think it *is* called the Lacemaker by Dali. Dali had a 'thing' for Vermeer's Lacemaker

...and rhinos

uk.youtube.com/watch?v=Dk8wNNL5v9M

Anonymous said...

/ rhino

That's the one. The youtube clip only explains part of it. But thanks anyway.