Wednesday, December 17, 2008

And the Crazy Old Loons shall inherit the Earth...

I just got this in an email from the Mrs over at the other side of the world...

"Met an old work friend of dad's for coffee this afternoon, with dad. He has taken NZ$40,000 out of the bank and buried it in his green house. He was wondering what would happen to the banks in the UK if all the rock stars wanted to get their millions out..."




Hehe, the insane old bastard

What's he doing burying cash when he should have got his hands on some GOLD!!




1 GBP = 1.0996 1.0972 1.0953 1.0942 1.0879 1.0777 EUR and falling...

.

44 comments:

Anonymous said...

thanks for the video stef,The 80´s had some pretty good tunes,,my mate used to have Blondie posters on his wall.

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=a7LZRaHz0Q8&feature=related

Blondie now.

http://www.blondie.net/archives/archived20030811/images/deborahharry/rockyhorror3.jpg

anyway we liked ska

The Selecter - On My Radio
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=rCqZW7xHm_Q

I always thought Pauline Black was well fuckin horny!!

Stef said...

still is

my, um, mate used to have Banshees posters on his wall

Anonymous said...

Bearing in mind Stef's earlier story entitled, "The Lone Trader Theory" (or some such), we have the following from Catherine Austin Fitts.

"I have started and managed several small businesses. It is hard to run one set of books for a small business. There are other people involved — not just the head of the company. There are bookkeepers, lawyers, accountants, regulators, tax preparers and auditors. The books have to be straight because so many people with so many different interests get in them. Brokerage accounts add another layer of complexity. Add money management and that is even more complexity.

And we are to believe that one guy could run a brokerage and money management firm with two sets of books and siphon off $50 billion? And no one knew?

This is the financial cover story equivalent of the yarn that a few devout Muslims hijacked two planes that hit skyscrapers that then magically collapsed leaving their passports and a copy of the Koran sitting on the sidewalk.

So…who has the $50 billion?
"

Anonymous said...

Yer know, chaps; talking of exchanging vids/records and such ... yer can't beat a bit of League every now and then ...

... OK, ready, let's do it ...

Stef said...

So…who has the $50 billion?"

There was a little discussion about this over at Lord P's blog

A fair slab of that $50bn would have gone in double digit returns to early 'investors' in the scheme but I share CAF's suspicion that a good slice of the rest will remain unaccounted for

The spectacle of some old scrote 'fessing up and accepting sole responsibility for a fraud certainly has the subtlest hint of a Long Firm about it

Anonymous said...

well what the fuck here is another great tune from that era!

The Beat - Mirror in the Bathroom
The Beat - Mirror in the Bathroom


note the following,

The Beat were formed in Birmingham, England in 1978, during a period of high unemployment and social upheaval in the United Kingdom. Ranking Roger, one of the band's vocalists, added a Jamaican vocal flavour to the band's sound with his toasting style. Jamaican saxophonist Saxa (b. Lionel Martin, 1930, aka Papa Saxa) added a Jamaican ska instrumental sound. Saxa had played saxophone with Prince Buster, Laurel Aitken and Desmond Dekker in the first wave of ska


hey fuck just maybe we may get some decent music again after this economic downturn!!!

Stef said...

Yer know, chaps; talking of exchanging vids/records and such ... yer can't beat a bit of League every now and then ...

or even something a little harder

I still have a 12" EP of Marc Almond singing Jimi Hendrix covers which easily the most surreal record I have ever heard

Stef said...

The Beat were the best live band I saw back in those days

Much sweating

Soft Cell / Human League tie for the worst. If you can count a couple of people noncing around in front of a huge tape deck for 60 minutes as being a 'live' performance

I forgave them, eventually

Anonymous said...

Pauline Black.

yep she is still very pretty.I always had a problem with her back in the 80´s,,it was her short hair and "boy" look,,,still thought she was attractive though!

paul said...

A fair slab of that $50bn would have gone in double digit returns

As its job was to 'invest', no doubt other slabs were 'placed' in 'vehicles' which would not 'perform' (for a certain cut).

paul said...

There,there,this'll make it better

Anonymous said...

"I still have a 12" EP of Marc Almond singing Jimi Hendrix covers which easily the most surreal record I have ever heard."

Marc singing, 'Hey Joe' is a sound to behold. (Can't find it on youtube though).

Have you read his autobiography?

Does anyone know if there's a bit of code out there that enables a visitor to a blog to click on a link to a number of youtube picks, rather than just one at a time?

Getting back to Marc moments - ever see him appear on Jools Holland when he did 'Black Kiss' (don't forget Enrique with the shouting. Did he borrow him from Mandelson?) and Say Hello? Ah, here's the one - keep an eye out for the chicks at the back, mouthing along. Fantastic!

Stef said...

aaaaah, Marc cheers me up even when he's being sad

You in a cocktail skirt
And me in a suit
(Well it just wasn't me)

quite

if I could convince myself that what's going on with the UK economy right now would herald the return of the late 70's, early 80's vibe it would almost be worth it

Stef said...

1 GBP = 1.0777 EUR

Anonymous said...

I don't hold onto cash long, usually it goes straight onto essentials (eg growing food) or paying bills...

Parabellum said...

Gentlemen, start your printing presses!

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=a1MsoPDHjFS4&refer=home

Parabellum said...

Do you hear that sound? It's the sound of money being printed!

(And I guess I would be smiling too...)

Parabellum said...

Is It A Bird? Is It A Plane? No It’s Helicopter-Bernanke! Money from above! Riding in with his 101st Airborne Reserve Bank! A tactic well rehearsed during the Iraq-"Conflict".

"Run, citizen, run!"

Parabellum said...

Of course, what the citizen doesn't know yet, the 38th Armoured "Gold-Bug" Cavalry Division is sweeping right behind enemy lines, performing its famous "Gold-fixing" manoeuvre. Bloody citizens, never able to put up an organized fight and never with good intel...

Stef said...

I suspect that Helicopter Ben will be using those special precision guided Smart Money Bombs to deliver their papery goodness straight into his chums' pockets

Everyone else will have to get by with whatever money they had to start with

Parabellum said...

That's the beauty! The people love money? Good, lets print some! In fact, lets print them to death with the stuff!

Stef said...

Earlier on in this thread I may have given the impression that sterling fell 3% against the Euro this afternoon

However, no mention of this fact was made by the UK State Broadcasting Company this evening so, clearly, I must have been mistaken

Stef said...

Our paper money is more worthless than your paper money!!

na na na na na na

Stef said...

I don't hold onto cash long, usually it goes straight onto essentials (eg growing food) or paying bills...

have you considered burying some in a greenhouse?

it might grow

Parabellum said...

Good news from the Malabar-Front! We are winning the War on Fictional Enemies! A great day for Oceania and its ally Eurasia!

Parabellum said...

stef post malreported pound rectify

Stef said...

Good news from the Malabar-Front! We are winning the War on Fictional Enemies! A great day for Oceania and its ally Eurasia!

Funny you should mention that...


UK troops to leave Iraq 'by July'

UK PM Mr Brown, who held talks with Mr Maliki before heading to Basra, said he was proud of British troops adding: "We leave Iraq a better place".


I just looked out of the window and was surprised to see no spontaneous street celebrations

ziz said...

Have a relative who was a storekeeper in an NCB pit.

He took the precaution of "liberating" the miners lanterns and burying them under his greenhouse.

Not gold but he claims that the market is steady and rising and has kept him in beer money for 20 years, reckons he has about another 7 years to go.

Merkin said...

Seeing as it is the silly season (I don't give a toss it's not my birthday) a couple of observations - no more.

For Stef : Is Prez Dubbya actually Major_De Coverly with shoes rather than flowers?


For Anonymous : Denize was on my wall even after my band played with her.

http://tinyurl.com/2bv9l4

Meanwhile, I am trying to set up an internet business selling mattresses as they seem to be the way to go.

I am also doing a bit of businesss on derivatives - ie sleeping bags.

To hedge my bets, i am taking singing lessons as i can always get a turn singing 'Blanket on the ground'.

Way to go.

Anonymous said...

Greenhouses, that reminds me...didn't the Icelanders do that with their cheap geothermal energy? One of the reasons that the whole Iceland thing suprised me (in scale terms)...

anon 22:41 said...

I think Madoff is a case of Sudden Adult Death Syndrome™, but for embarrassing money. However I do not exclude a proper SADS™ later, as patsies have a tendency to attract crazy gunmen, commit suicide, or suffer unfortunate fatal accidents.

Somehow it reminds me of the SocGen affair, where the bank was victim of a hideous £4 billion scam performed by a solitary rogue trader. Luckily SocGen only lost £2 billions in subprimes.

The Madoff ponzi scheme was uncovered as far back as 1999, but the SEC ignored and closed investigations. A bit like when another big agency ignored warnings about airliners and buildings.

Stef said...

but the SEC ignored and closed investigations

'Shana Madoff' is a name worth googling in this context
SEC to Probe Relationship Between Madoff’s Niece and Ex-SEC Lawyer

Stef said...

didn't the Icelanders do that with their cheap geothermal energy?

yes, they did, before the corrupting power of imaginary money worked its special brand of magic

As anyone who has visited one of the two interesting things worth visiting in Iceland will tell you, Icelanders are inordinately proud of the fact that, thanks to geothermal energy, they are Europe's leading exporter of bananas

though, sadly, nowhere near enough the several billion bananas that are going to be required to keep the IMF happy

Stef said...

Did Madoff act alone?

It's hard enough to legitimately manage $50 billion. To falsify books and hide that big a sum, though, experts suggest Bernard Madoff had help. But who?

(Fortune) -- Like the conclusion that Lee Harvey Oswald was a lone gunman, the theory that Bernard Madoff acted alone is hard to swallow...


Wow, you don't fucking say

Parabellum said...

Oh, this makes me cry:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSBUEDilL84

Anonymous said...

Rosella Dossi, Italy's Invisible Government CERC Working Papers Series , no.1/2001 (50 pp).

A paper from someone's PhD thesis from Melbourne University. It begins with the Bologna bombing and covers material known by all self-respecting conspiraloons. The point of posting? The stark incredible denial of the MSM is fascinatingly weird: the paper provides a sober counterpoint to illustrate such.

Anonymous said...

"Many capitalist states manage to balance the two competing needs of legitimation and accumulation through a two-fold strategy.
On the one hand, in order to etain public support, the State alleviates the worst effects of capitalism on the lower classes by developing the welfare state. On the other hand, the lower classes have been socialized into elieving the welfare state works to their advantage. That is, the elite enjoys a cultural and ideological hegemony. Italian Communist leader Antonio Gramsci first developed this idea in the 1930s. Gramsci tried to explain the failure of the Marxist prediction that the capitalist state would fall because of its own contradictions by theorizing that in a capitalist society the social and political values of the elite enjoy an “ideological hegemony”. These values are then promulgated through the mass media and the bourgeois educational system (Bellamy and Schecter, 1993).
"

From Rosella's paper.

Anonymous said...

"Based on these premises, I would argue that, when in a representative democracy the dominant class — the elite — fails to maintain dominance through open and legitimate means, and that elite does not have the option of maintaining power through the establishment of an overtly authoritarian regime, the elite will resort to the establishment of an invisible government, into which to channel the political power that has been in part taken away, secretly, from the legitimate government of the country."

More from Rosella

Stef said...

@anon/ parabellum

good stuff, thx

Parabellum said...

Oh boy, oh boy. We are all in for a big ride.
http://www.nbr.co.nz/article/nzers-warned-adjust-current-account-or-be-forced-do-so-39302

Living on an island:
Plus: Hard to invade in case of war, as one would need to ship an army there (+10 points in defence).
Minus: Every thing not produced there has to be shipped (-10 points in foreign trade)

I like having land borders with neighbouring countries - even if the official economy breaks down, you can always smuggle, just need some wheels! (Well, one could get a boat, but hey)

But in case the neighbouring regime thinks it is a good time to remove your regime (and all its resources including workforce), a little blue water is a nice moat...

Parabellum said...

And Japan's export volume just dropped by a quarter:
http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5gN_kUngERLcfGYFHR3q1grHfn_kAD957MG880

Stef said...

only a quarter

that's quite good, all things considered

Stef said...

I like having land borders with neighbouring countries - even if the official economy breaks down, you can always smuggle, just need some wheels! (Well, one could get a boat, but hey)

New Zealand will be going down, hard. Not as bad as Iceland, as the Kiwis are capable of feeding themselves, but it won't be fun

Of course, if you read and believe the Kiwi press you could be forgiven for thinking that they're almost halfway through the bad times already

I understand where you're coming from with the borders comment but low population density also counts for something

Stef said...

Besides basic strategies listed in the official rulebook, there are several other strategies one can apply, many of which revolve around the tactics of fortification. For instance, players often attempt to gain control of what the game manual calls Australia (Australasia) early in the game, since Australia is the only continent that can be successfully defended by heavily fortifying one country (either Siam or Indonesia).[7] Generally, continents with fewer borders are easier to defend as they possess fewer points that can be attacked by other players. A much riskier and more ambitious strategy involves attempting to hold North America, which provides a sizable five army bonus, but requires three different entry point territories to be defended.

Usually, it is best to hold territories within a compact area, in order to facilitate both defense and attack. Spreading one's territories across the globe is risky, since it usually leads to fighting on many fronts and the rapid depletion of one's forces.

Geography also plays a large role in strategy. For example, Australia offers better defense, while South America offers better offense. Australia can be easily defended, since it has the fewest borders, yet its only neighboring continent is Asia, which is the most difficult to maintain. By contrast, South America is more difficult to defend, since it has two borders and the same value of bonus reinforcements as Australia, yet its neighboring continents are North America and Africa, which are both easier to obtain and defend, compared to Asia.